Handmade Native American Sterling Silver Ring with Spiny Oyster Stone Size 5.75
Handmade Native American Sterling Silver Ring with Spiny Oyster Stone Size 5.75
Handmade Native American Sterling Silver Ring with Spiny Oyster Stone Size 5.75
Handmade Native American Sterling Silver Ring with Spiny Oyster Stone Size 5.75
Handmade Native American Sterling Silver Ring with Spiny Oyster Stone Size 5.75
Handmade Native American Sterling Silver Ring with Spiny Oyster Stone Size 5.75
Handmade Native American Sterling Silver Ring with Spiny Oyster Stone Size 5.75

Handmade Native American Sterling Silver Ring with Spiny Oyster Stone Size 5.75

Regular price $29.99 Sale

Handmade Native American sterling silver ring with orange spiny oyster stone in a size 5.75. This ring is very sturdy and great for everyday wear.The material called, “Spiny Oyster,” used by Native American artists to make inlays in fine jewelry, comes from the shell of the bivalve mollusk, Spondylus varius. The genus’ scientific name, “Spondylus,” means “spines on its back.” Aside from its scientific name, it’s also known as Thorny Oyster, Spiny Oyster, Spondylus, and Spondylid. Like many other bivalve mollusks, the soft, meaty interior of Spondylus is edible, so the Spiny Oyster’s valued for its hard, outer shell as well as its interior meat.The shell’s made up of several parts, and the portion used to make inlays is known as Aragonite, which consists of the carbonate mineral, calcium carbonate. Aragonite has the same chemical formula as calcite, but it’s formed by biological and physical processes in marine and freshwater environments.The crystal lattice of aragonite varies from that of calcite. Looking at smooth, polished Spiny Oyster set in a ring next to turquoise, one sees a very smooth, polished orange or red surface. The most commonly used Spondylid Bivalve shell colors include orange, reds, and purples and may include distinct striations and color variations. The Yellow Spiny Oyster’s especially rare.In the American Oceans, the Spondylids occur along the North American coasts, as far north as North Carolina, on the Atlantic Coast, and northwestern Mexico, on the Pacific Coast. It develops in waters to South America. The Orange Spiny Oyster occurs in shallow to moderately deep waters, where snorkelers and scuba divers readily harvest them. Purple Spiny Oysters grow in deeper water, making them more difficult to find and harvest.\n
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